The Amish Cook from Oasis Newsfeatures

Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

It's a brilliant idea, another example of Anabaptist entrepreneurialism at work.  The Hutterite colonies in the Dakotas, Montana, and the Canadian breadbasket are often situated on barren, wind-swept prairies.  Why not turn the wind into some $$$$?  That is exactly what is starting to happen.  Companies seeking alternative sources of energy, namely wind-power, are finding the Hutterite colonies attractive places to erect the giant wind turbines.   I've seen such turbines before, I think someplace in Illinois and perhaps in North Dakota.  They are kind of....majestic-looking in a man-made sort of way.  Click here to read about the Hutterites and their wind farms.  Has anyone else seen these giant windmills? Are they elegant?  Or eyesores?

And in another good Earth Day post, would you pay $4.89 for a quart of milk?  Probably not.  But what if it was delivered directly to your door in recyclable containers and the milk is from hormone-free, pasture-raised cows on Amish farms? Hmmmm, maybe.  If I lived in New York City - where this service is offered - and running to the supermarket for anything isn't easy, this would probably be very appealing.  Click here to read about "Manhattan Milk."

staib18's picture

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

I want to comment on both stories. First I am very much in favor of  wind farms. I find it interesting though that the people who cry against using the standard means to create electricity are also the ones who are against the wind farms because it interrupts there view. I find them beautiful in any form I've seen them in.

I live in the Hudson valley. I remember the milk being delivered when I was 5 in Norfolk Virginia. Though we don't have that service here today, there is a local farm farther down state that distributes milk in glass bottles to some of the health food stores. They have a 1.00 deposit on them so they sell for about about .80 I think. the website is www.ronnybrook.com if anyone is interested. They are not amish but I have never had better milk than from a glass bottle. 

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

Ok I'll show my age and tell you that I can remember when there was a milk man that came to your door and delievered not only milk but cottage cheese, and butter.  The milk came in glass bottles and you gave the empty bottles back to the milk man.  We lived on a rural road where houses sat on 3-5 acre lots (vs a subdivision).  I was VERY young (preschool age) but I do remember my mom having a conversation with the milk man about the stores being able to sell the milk cheaper than he could which he feared (and rightfully so) would put him out of business.  My mom stayed with him until he stopped delivering.  I think not so much for the milk but for the twice weekly visits.  He always stayed and talked to her for a while.  Many times this is how mom found out what was going on with some of the neighbors who lived futher down the road.  But would I pay someone to deliever milk to my house for that price? Nope.  We go through a gallon of milk every two days.  At their prices, I couldn't afford it.

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

Hi

 I also remember the milkman, and I lived in the suburbs of NYC. We had a milk box on the front porch and the milk man came and put the glass bottles of milk in the box. I recall that there was a paper cap on the bottles, and another paper plug on the milk spout. When you took off the paper plug, cream was on the bottom! The milk man as you say, sold other dairy products as well. My father still has the milk box , Dellwood Milk, which is now a collector's item.  I don't think most Americans would be able to afford milk deliveries anymore, but in New York City there is a much wealthier element who are willing to pay for this type of specialty item.  For goodness sakes, these people pay for grocery deliveries at all hours of the night. There is a website that is connected to a supermarket, and the order is placed online and delivered to their door. Some of these stores have all kinds of items that cost immense amounts of money, but these people can afford it. Susan

dcharrison's picture

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

I remember the glass bottles with the paper plugs from my childhood when visiting my aunt in St. Louis in the early to mid 60's.  But I also had milk delivered to my home twice a week in 1978 when my oldest was a baby.  And I bought cottage cheese from the milk man as well.  Interesting side note on it - it was the same milk man that had delivered to my mother when I was a child in the neighboring town.

Cindy/KS

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

Although I personally think using a renewable resource such as the wind (or solar energy) is a good thing, there are potential problems with the wind turbines -- noise (the continuous woooshhh.......woooshhh......woooshhh...... all day long) and the "flickering shadow effect" from the moving blades can be a nuisance for those living nearby. For the wide-open spaces on the prairies, I say "more power to 'em!!"

Re: Winds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

By the way, many Amish have been using windmills for years....The windmills they use are the tall, rickety kind...circular in shape...blades radiating out like spokes.  Lovina's Mom had one for years that powered their water pump.  The Amish, of the most part, have been good stewards of the environment.  I hadn't given the wooooosh, woooosh much thought.....but, living in "subdivision central", I guess I won't have to worry about anyone putting a wind farm near my house:)

Re: WInds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

"A mind is like a parachute. It doesnt work if it's not open."- Frank Zappa

Oh... I definitely wouldn't pay that much for a quart of milk!  A quart (4 cups) of milk wouldn't last us from breakfast to lunch!  LOL  We have milk available in our area from a creamery that is hormone-free... and if you want to pay the $3 deposit, you can get it in glass bottles.  I just buy it in gallon jugs and recycle them or use them for a craft/garden thing Smile

Re: WInds of Change On Hutterite Land; And The Milkman Cometh...

"A mind is like a parachute. It doesnt work if it's not open."- Frank Zappa

 They have showcased on the news people in our area who are buying those wind-turbines to generate electricity for their homes.  I believe that they even sell the extra energy back to the electric company (not sure how that works).  They run around $25,000 I believe, but the people on the news said they figured that it would pay for itself in 5 years.  There is a company between here (Keokuk) and Ft. Madison called Siemens that I believe makes a part of these wind turbines... and they are in the process of trying to make Keokuk a "Port Authority" and bring in another business down by the river (Mississippi) that will make the other part.  I am not a business person and don't understand all of this, but I know it is a huge deal because it will bring a lot of jobs and business to our area.

There is a place between Quincy (IL) and Hannibal (MO) that has a whole bunch of these windmills.  It actually looks kind of neat.  They are incredibly tall (like 60-80 feet I think).  Even on a supposedly windless day, at that altitude there is always enough wind-power to turn the turbines.