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COUNTRY HAM

YESTERDAY MY HUSBAND WENT BY THE STORE ONHIS WAY HOME FROMWORK AND PICKED UP ONE OF THOSE CLIFFTY FARMS HAMS,YOU KNOW THE ONES THAT ARE CURED.WELL ONTHE LABEL IT SAYS TO BOIL IT FOR 20 MINUTES PER 10 LBS.IHAVE NEVER FIXED ONE OF THESE,BUT I DO KNOW THE REASON FOR BOILING IT IS BECAUSE THEY ARE SALT CURED,CAN SOMEONE PLEASE GIVE ME SOME ADVISE ONTHIS.AFTER I BOIL IT DO I BAKE IT INOVENWITH GLAZE.THE LABEL DID NOT TELL ME THAT ,I DO NOT WANT TO MESS IT UP BECAUSE IT WAS NOT A CHEAP HAMMY HUSBAND WANTS ME TO FIX IT FOR SUNDAY SO ANY HELP WOULD GLADLY BE APPRECIATED GOD BLESS


Country Ham

I haven't fixed a country ham in a long time.  I like country ham but usually too saltly for me.  You were right in that the soaking is to help reduce the salt in the ham but also to help 'rehydrate' it (if you where to eat it without soaking it, it might be like eating 'sawdust.')  My mom would do the soak over night and it seemed to help with the salt content a lot.  I have a friend who fixes it every Christmas.  She soaks it overnight in milk and she swears by this meathod (seems costly to me).  I do buy the Country ham slices and will soak mine warm water for 10-15 minutes and that helps with the saltyness.  As far as following the directions on the package, it sounds like it would work with you cooking it however you want to after you do what they told you to do.

 

LuvMaerz's picture
Cooking a country ham

I did a little search for you and found one way to do it.  I will copy and post it here.  I have never had a country ham, but I read an article a while back in the paper, and they are supposed to be a special treat!!  My husband loves ham and has eatten a ham sandwich for lunch almost every day at work since we have been married (6 1/2 years)!

These hams are supposed to be incredibly salty because of the curing process.  Due to the wonderful science of osmosis (I am a nurse/scientist by profession), the high levels of salt in the meat will diffuse into the soaking water, which has no salt in it, in nature's attempt to make the salt level in the meat and in the water the same.  Very much the same principle used when deciding what type of IV solution to give to a patient... but that's another story all together Wink

 (The following info I found on a website, which also gives ideas for the glaze, etc.):

Place ham in a very large container and cover it with tap water. Soak the ham overnight and pour off the water. If the ham is two years old or encrusted with a thick tough brine which does not come off in the first soaking, repeat the process with fresh water. Fill the tub once again with warm water and scrub the ham with a stiff brush. Pour off the water. Fill the tub a final time with cold water and soak for 1 hour. Remove the ham from the bath and rinse with running water. Place ham in a large roasting pan, add 8 to 10 cups of liquid. Place roaster in a cold oven; set temperature at 325 degrees and roast for 12 minutes to the pound after the temperature light goes off. (Regarding the liquid: Apple cider, apple juice, beer, coke, 7up are recent recommendations. I prefer apple juice. )
Remove ham from roaster and reserve pan juices. Chill juices and remove solid fat from the surface. Reserve juices and fat for further use if desired. Remove skin and reserve. Remove fat except for 1/4 inch covering the surface of the ham. Trim this fat to appear as smooth as possible. Using a sharp knife of a thin wire, score the ham fat across in both directions creating a diamond or checker board effect. Meanwhile, reduce 1 cup of pan juices to 1/4 cup. Add 2 cups of brown sugar, 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon dry mustard. Stir and simmer to create a paste about the consistency of jar mustard. Coat the surface of the ham with the sauce. Place a whole clove in each cross cut. Return ham to 350 degree oven and bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until the sauce has formed a glaze. Remove ham from oven and allow to rest at least 30 minutes before carving. Ham may be served warm, room temperature or chilled. Present your beautiful roast to guests and then carve into very thin slices to arrange on a platter garnished with fresh or dried fruits and greens such as parsley or kale.

country ham

oh my gosh,that is so much work,but i will have ot becuase we have the ham.lol thanks a bunch.I dared my husband to ever get one of these again.lol just kidding.ill have to get up before the rooster does to fix this.thankyou so much fro your time ,it was very thoughtful.god bless

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