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Piles of Potatoes

 

Well, I promised some photos from my recent visit to Lovina's house and here's one for starters.  The soil is very sandy in Lovina's area of Michigan which makes it ideal for growing potatoes. As you can see from the above photo, Lovina has enjoyed a bumper crop this summer.  These are smaller, reddish potatoes which can keep for a long, long time stored in a cool dark cellar.  The photo above was taken in a corner of Lovina's cellar.  Lovina sent a generous batch of these potatoes home with Rachel and I, which we have enjoyed potatoes now for several suppers.  These particular potatoes lend themselves very well to served mashed, with the skins, and some butter. Yum!


Re: Piles of Potatoes

Carrots are a "biennial" plant, which means they have to be left over winter and then will come into bloom and produce seed in the second summer.  By the way, "Queen Anne's Lace", the common late summer wildflower of most fields and meadows, is actually wild carrot! Just pull one up by the root, break it open and sniff...  The roots are not real big, but are perfectly edible (they will get woody if too old)...Laughing

LuvMaerz's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift... that's why they call it the present."

How interesting!  We have Queen Annes Lace all over the place here, growing in ditches, etc.  I will have to check that out.  I was once told that in places like California, this wildflower is quite expensive to put in bouquets,etc.  I don't know if that is true, as I have never been west of my  homestate!

Re: Piles of Potatoes

Lovina makes a homemade jam from Queen Anne's Lace, but be careful...QAL resembles hemlock...know what you are picking before harvesting!

Re: Piles of Potatoes

Seeing the picture of red potatoes reminds me of one of my favorite (and most requested) recipes that I make. These are easy and taste so fresh. I have no measurements- just eyeball it!

Wash and quarter red potatoes and place them in baking dish (single layer)

Drizzle olive oil over potatoes- they should just be drizzled- not swimming in it.

Next, chop fresh rosemary (use the real stuff) and sprinkle it around on the potatoes.

Also, add some minced garlic (maybe 1 T), some salt and some pepper.

Then, stir it all together and bake at about 350 for 45 minutes or till done.

This is also a great recipe because you only need one dish!! Trust me- you'll love them....

momof3letmebe's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

They do look good!  I LOVE potatoes!Tongue out  It doesn't matter how you cook 'em, I'll eat 'em!  LOL  I would love to try growing my own.  How do they start...as seeds?  If so, where do the seeds come from?  When we planted our carrots this year, my kids asked that question...where do carrot seeds come from???  I have NO idea.  Any clues?

LuvMaerz's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift... that's why they call it the present."

Duh! I didn't read your question right.  I will assume carrots, if left alone, will go to seed on their "tops".  I have never had any luck with carrots, but I know that is what happens to radishes.

Re: Piles of Potatoes

Luv, I too have never had luck with carrots.  Went to the local co op. and they told me that my soil was too hard (duh?) and to add sand to the area where I plant carrots and it would help.  Never did it but you might want to give it a try.

momof3letmebe's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

Our soil here is mostly red clay, and we had pretty good carrots.  It was my first time ever growing them. 

LuvMaerz's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift... that's why they call it the present."

Carrots grow from tiny seeds.  Potatoes grow from "seed potatoes", which are basically potatoes that have "eyes" on them.  If you have ever left a potato alone for too long, you know how it starts growing little sprouty things?  Well, you cut the potato up (making sure that each piece you plant has at least 3 eyes), and them bury them in a trench in the garden.  When the plant comes up, you keep mounding up the soil around it, and the taller the plant grows, you just keep mounding up the soil.  When you want some baby potatoes (or larger) you just dig into your mound until you find them.  At the end of the season, when the plant is starting to dry up, you generally take a big pitchfork and upturn the whole row, then pick the potatoes out of it.

At least... this is how we do it Wink

momof3letmebe's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

Thanks Luv!  I guess I could have Googled it, but I like getting that kind of information from here......from people who actually do these kinds of things!Wink

I think I may try potatoes............

dcharrison's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

Yes, the carrot tops will start producing seeds, if you leave them long enough.

And I have heard that you can grow potatoes in a barrel filled with straw as well - just keep adding straw as it climbs, I guess.

Cindy/KS

LuvMaerz's picture
Re: Piles of Potatoes

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift... that's why they call it the present."

Oooh, those look so good!  I love red-skinned potatoes because I don't have to peel them. They are perfect to take camping... just cut them up, toss with a little oil, salt/peper, and wrap up in a foil packet.  Throw it on the grill or over the campfire, and YUM!

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