amish

Diann's picture

Amish plowing

Hubby and I just got back from a trip up to the lake, in the Lakeview, OH area. We saw lots of Amish out and about on this beautiful, warm, sunny day. One field we passed was being plowed by a little boy, no older than 10, I'd guess, and his plow was being pulled by 6 large horses! Oh, how I wish I would have had my camera along with me to share that photo! I have seen many Amish men plowing their fields before, but never any using 6 horses! I marveled at how that little one could control that many horses! What a neat sight! Next time you can bet I'll have my camera with me!

Rumspringa

I live in an Amish area in northeast Wisconsin and am friendly with my neighbors--always curious to learn more about their culture and beliefs and am happy to have found this site! We just watched the documentary "The Devils Playground" about the Amish tradition of "Rumspringa" which literally means, I believe, "running around". The kids in this movie were very into drinking, drugs and sexual activity. They even dressed English and stayed away from home for days at a time. I just can't imagine the youth in our area participating in activities like that! Does this really happen in Amish Communities all over the country? I asked one young Amish man in his 20s about it and he told me it was a "rumor". Anyone know more about this tradition?

staib18's picture

Just got back from Lancaster

 My wife and I celebrated our 13th anniversary last Wednesday by going to where we always love to go. Lancaster Pennsylvania. It was beautiful, that is if you can find yourself outside of the tourist traps. I did. My favorite part was jogging in the morning down a side street outside of Intercourse. We stayed at Kitchen Kettle-which has a nice clean bed and breakfast among all the other trappings. But these jogs I took were breath taking. Where I live in the Hudson Valley we don't have rolling hills and farm land which goes on for miles. I love the farm land and enjoy it with all my senses. Yes even the smells. I love the clip/clop clip/clop of the Horse and buggies that go by. I saw work horses running and jumping, a feat I thought was impossible for an animal that size. The cows run to the fence looking for food. And the corn! Some of which was being cut I believe for silage. At the end of one jog I discovered a working covered bridge and marveled at the architecture on the inside. I never want to leave when we go and usually do so feeling down. 

One of the other things we did while there was to see "In the Beginning" at Sight and Sound. It was very nicely done but because there are allot of information left out of the very beginning of Genesis, they filled in the gaps by creating characters and dialogue which is not in the Bible. This is fine for the majority of us who go to these shows but I felt that if you were going without any prior experience with the Bible and Christian beliefs, it would seem very confusing and quite alarming. But it was quite beautiful and moving and I enjoyed it.  

Kevin I'm sorry I didn't take the tour where you can speak to Amish in their setting(s) as promised. I went to their own website and there were many complaints about the winery which was part of the tour. It sounded very touristy and I just couldn't bring myself to doing it. I would just rather stick to the side roads and hope to learn more from observation outside of tourist destinations.  Now that isn't to say that we didn't eat at the usual spots which would alarm my Dr. I fought valiently not to over eat but I enjoyed one of my favorites from Stoltzful Farm Restaurant. Their country sausage which is unlike anything I've ever tasted and that's only one of the things I liked.

Anyway as I said, I had a great time.  

eggcetra_farms's picture

Amish Oatmeal Bread

I made the Amish oatmeal bread from the recipe on this site yesterday.  WOW!  I am very, very pleased!  This bread is SO moist and soft.  I've never seen a recipe quite like it and I've never had bread come out so good!  

 

I'd post pictures here, but since I'm not sure how you can go to my forum where I posted about this to see pics of the bread after it was done rising in the pans and then once it was done baking.  MARVELOUS!!  

http://farmingaround.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=60&t=576 

amish civil rights in hammond new york

if any of you have been following the national news coverage of the treatment that some of the amish in my area have been recieving from local officials you can now help out, the following link will take you to a page to sign a petition to investigate alleged Civil Rights violations and alleged continued religious persecution against the Amish Swartzentruber sect in denying them building permits by Town of Morristown Code Enforcement Officer Kay Davis. here is the link    http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/swartzamish/index.html

your help would be greatly appreciated, they have been going through a lot and on top of it all this happened today,

 An Ogdensburg woman has been ticketed after her car struck an Amish buggy - causing the operator to be thrown from the carriage.It happened at approximately 8 a.m. Thursday on State Route 68 in the town of Oswegatchie.State police say 63 year old Diane Fitzgerald of 136 Arnold Wagner Road in Ogdensburg struck the rear of a buggy.The impact caused the buggy’s operator, 44 year old Jonas Swartzentruber, to be ejected.

staib18's picture

AMISH LIVING AND CAREERS

I WAS WONDERING IF SOMEONE OUT THERE CAN ANSWER THIS. DO THE AMISH STRIVE FOR THINGS THAT INTEREST THEM AS A CAREER(SO TO SPEAK?) OR DO THEY END UP DOING WHAT THEY WERE RAISED DOING-PERHAPS THERE PARENTS SAW THAT THEY HAD A TALENT FOR SOMETHING AND STEERED THEM IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION. THE REASON I ASK IS THAT I HAVE PURSUED THE GRAPHIC ARTS FOR SEVERAL YEARS NOW AND HAVE HAD LIMITED RESULTS. I HAVE AN OK JOB BUT ONE THAT DOESN'T PAY WELL AND SEEMS TO BE MORE FRUSTRATING THAN IT'S WORTH. I JUST KEEP THINKING THAT THIS ISN'T WHAT I'M SUPPOSED TO BE DOING-LIKE GOD HAD SOMETHING MORE IMPORTANT TO DO BUT I GOT OFF TRACK SOMEWHERE. I ALWAYS END UP THINKING ABOUT THE AMISH BECAUSE FROM MY PERSPECTIVE THEY ARE NOT THINKING IN TERMS OF CAREER BUT NECESSITY. THAT WORKING THE LAND LINKS THEM MORE CLOSELY TO GOD. HOPEFULLY I AM BEING CLEAR.

THE BIBLE STUDY HAD TO DO WITH TURNING THINGS OVER TO GOD AND ALLOWING HIM TO STEER YOUR LIFE. YOU PRAY FOR THINGS DILIGENTLY LIKE A CAREER AND SOMETIMES THE ANSWER COMES IN WAYS YOU DON'T EXPECT. MY PROBLEM IS THAT EVERYTHING IS GREAT AT CHURCH AND I HAVE THE UNDERSTANDING OF LESSONS BUT I HAVE TROUBLE PERFORMING IT. I WANT TO BE IN CONTROL. 

Update on New York Amish boy; Mennonites in Texas

We featured something on this site the other day about an Amish family in New York state that is refusing to treat their boy for a heart condition.  This is a very strange story because this type of view regarding medical treatment is very rare among the Amish.  Most Amish people will eventually seek out modern medicine in a case like this.  There's no "official" church position about whether Amish should embrace modern medicine, so the decision is very individual.  There are many that are reluctant to seek out medical care due to cost or just general suspicion. Many will head to Mexico for alternative therapries.  But these are usually adults, refusing to treat a child is - while not unheard of among the Amish - a very uncommon position to take. I think the public defender has his work cut out for him.   The first time I saw a story about this it was posted on a television station's website and they incorrectly reported that "refusing medical treatment" was an "Amish view."  At least this piece in the Watertown, New York paper didn't make such an inaccurate and broad statement, but I am annoyed that the paper felt it necessary to publish the family's address.  This is completely unnecessary and even irresponsible in today's internet world.  Publishing addresses of people was once common practice in smaller newspapers, but this has generally fallen out of favor. I wish the Watertown paper would discontinue this. Click here to read the full article.

There are a couple of conservative Mennonite communities in Texas. I'd love to visit those someday because they've developed their own quirky cultural customs in Deep Texas.  An exhibit at Bethel College in Kansas showcases these Texas communities by some researchers who have chronicled them. If you're near Newton, Kansas this exhibit might be worth checking out.

 

Prime Time Surprise

Well, I was wrong and pleasantly surprised.  I just watched ABC's offering about Amish teens in rebellion (rumspringa). And while I'm still not quite sure what network TV's fascination is with Amish teenagers, the program was pretty good. They didn't sensationalize (I found the reporter a trifle annoying) and the four Amish teens profiled represented a fair spectrum of sects.  My only admonition is that not ALL Amish children go through this "rumspringa" period.  But, really, I was pleased with the show otherwise. So I don't have much to say other than that I was pleasantly surprised.  Anyone else watch it?

Book Review: Amish Voices of Harmony

Every now and then I stumble across a real gem of a book about the Amish.  Sometimes I also stumble across horribly written books about them.  I just got done with one of those, but I won't name the author to save him or her some embarrassment. But it was terrible.

Anyway, back to a good book.  This one is entitled "Amish Voices of Harmony" by Drucilla Milne.  This book is a follow-up to her first edition, entitled "The Amish of Harmony." I have not read the Milne's first book, but it has sold over 10,000 copies, which is no small feat.

Amish Voices is a detailed, textured look at the people and places that make up Harmony, Minnesota.  This area boasts the state's largest Amish population.  What makes Milne's book shine is that she doesn't approach the topic as if she the world's most knowledgable expert on Amish culture.  Instead, she plays the role of old-fashioned reporter digging for vignettes and anecdotes and letting the stories speak for themselves.  There's an honesty to her writing that allows one to feel as if they are accompanying her on a journey of discovery. 

One of my favorite stories in the book is when she describes a surprise visit by Queen Noor and King Hussein of Jordan to Harmony (his Exellency was being treated at the nearby Mayo Clinic at the time).   But the book also contains interesting looks at healthcare, schools, jobs and faith as it relates to the Amish of Harmony.  Too many authors try to approach the Amish with a big brush and in the process affix generalizations and stereotypes to them.  Milne just sticks with the Amish of Harmony and that narrow approach is what makes this book worth a read.

Click here to vist Milne's website and buy the book. 

Wonderful Holmes County Inn

I first discovered the Inn at Honey Run when I was in Holmes County about 15 years ago.  These accomodations aren't your typical Amish country kitsch.  The Inn at Honey Run is tucked away amid the rolling emerald-colored hills of Holmes County.  The Inn has often been a bucolic retreat for the state's governors and other high profile people seeking a low-profile escape.  The Inn doesn't advertise, it doesn't need to.  Word of mouth does the job just fine.  This is an article that appeared in The Columbus Dispatch over the weekend that describes this beautiful Ohio hideaway.

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