The Amish Cook from Oasis Newsfeatures

Buggy Mystery

 

The top photo was submitted to me by site regular, Diann, and it does have me scratching my head.  First of all, this photo was shot near Mount Victory, Ohio, which a small town in no-man's land between Kenton and Bellfontaine in rural Hardin County.  While there are Amish in the area, there aren't Swartzentruber Amish hat I am aware, although I certainly don't profess to know where every Swartz church is located.  For newcomers here the Swartzentruber Amish are among the most conservative sects of the church.  Most  Swartzes strenuously object to the bright slow-moving vehicle orange triangle emblem that Ohio state law requires them to display, feeling that it is too garish.  The second photo is one I took of a Swartzentruber buggy near Sinking Springs, Ohio in the southern part of the state where there is a small sect.  Both buggies pictured above do not display the slow-moving vehicle orange triangle emblem.

Ohio state law does require Amish buggies to display the orange triangle OR as a substitute, buggies may use gray reflective tape along the back border  (Pennsylvania also allows this substitute).The bottom buggy - although it is difficult to see in this distant shot - DOES display the gray tape along the back border.  The buggy that Diann photographed has neither the tape along the border (it appears there are strips of some sort but not the required border display) or a triangle, which is in violation of state law....so I'm scratching my head...was there an orange triangle there but it just fell off and the owner hadn't bothered to replace it yet? Or is this some ultra-conservative sect in Hardin County of which I'm unaware?   Anyone have any ideas or insights?

Re: Buggy Mystery

Oh, another thing about the Kenton Amish.  There was a case a couple of years back about some Kenton Amish boys who were arrested by a game warden for deer hunting with no orange vest or orange stocking cap during gun season.  Their argument was that wearing orange was against their religion. 

The judge that heard the case ruled against the Amish.  Appropriately, I think.  He told them that if it was against their religion to wear the "hunger's orange" then maybe they shouldn't hunt.  Hunting wasn't an essential.  If they were so convicted they should be willing to live up to their convictions and give up the hunting.  Or, if they didn't want to give up hunting they should abide by the law like everybody else and wear the hunter's orange for their own protection and for other hunters, as well.

paulaayn's picture

Re: Buggy Mystery

Definitely the right decision.  Hunting safety over-rules 'rules' about colour.  It's for the protection of other hunters too. 

Re: Buggy Mystery

I don't know about Ohio Revised Code but I can tell you about the Amish in Hardin County.

They are a very conservative Amish sect.  They are not as conservative as the Schwartzenbrubers but close.  There are about seven church districts in Hardin County of these people.  The Belle Center Amish call them the Kenton Leut because Kenton is the county seat of Hardin County.

The Kenton Amish would be in fellowship with Polk, OH Amish; Bremen, OH; Stockport, OH; Gladwin, MI; Chesterhill, OH.  They go back and forth quite a bit with the Degraff, OH Amish in Logan County where I live.  Their buggies make the treck quite often.  They have stopped by my place, already , to water their horses.

Kenton Amish would not use propane.  Lights would be coal oil lanterns and lamps.  Refrigeration would be ice cut from farm ponds in the winter and stored in insulated ice houses and packed in sawdust. 

The Kenton Amish do not use the orange triangles.   Also, the lights on their buggies are small coal oil lamps set in closed boxers on the sides of the buggy.  The front of the box has a clear window.  The back of the box has a red window.  Trust me, you don't get blinded by the lights coming off of these buggies.  They can just about be a hazard at night.

A van load of us went up to visit in the homes of some of the older widows and widowers up Hardin County.  They were very gracious.  The homes are very plain.  One thing, there, they don't allow upholstered furniture.  No couches in their living room.  But, every living room I saw had a daybed or cot that they were sitting on.  Somethingn  a little softer for the old behind but not a worldly, fancy, couch like the Belle Center Amish have.  So goes it.  To each his own.

The Kenton Amish would milk by hand.  While we were there it came about time to do the evening chores.  I saw a teenage boy head out to the barn with about four kerosene lanterns to do the milking.

Kenton Amish buggies would be top buggies but without the stormfronts and sliding doors that the  Belle Center buggies have.  The Degraff Amish only drive open buggies even in winter.  BRRR!!

Hope this answers some questions.

Re: Buggy Mystery

Gusluke, I am waiting for you to weigh in on this!Smile

paulaayn's picture

Re: Buggy Mystery

Do you know for sure the law says it has to be on the border?  Maybe they think there just has to be something reflective on the back? 

Re: Buggy Mystery

Paula, no I do not know with 100 percent certainty that it has to be on the border....that is the common custom and that is what a lot of the literature says: that it has the tape has to be on the back border/outline of the buggy, but I can't find a specific reference to it in the Ohio Revised Code, so right now I can't say with certainty - Kevin

Re: Buggy Mystery

If you can't find it in the Ohio Revised Code then it might be in the case law instead.